Tuesday, Sep 30, 2014
  • Home
Opinion

The foolish anti-vaccine crusade


Published:   |   Updated: March 21, 2014 at 02:49 PM

In a feat that would have been unimaginable a few decades ago, the anti-vaccine movement has managed to breathe life into nearly vanquished childhood diseases. It took all the ingenuity and know-how we are capable of to find safe, effective ways to dramatically diminish diseases like measles and whooping cough in the developed world; it took all the hysteria and willful ignorance we are capable of to give them a boost.

A developer of the measles vaccine, Samuel Katz, says the question “is not whether we shall see a world without measles, but when.” Not if Jenny McCarthy has anything to say about it. The former Playboy model and current co-host of “The View” is a leading light of the anti-vaccine movement.

She has a boy with autism-like symptoms that she is convinced were caused by the vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella. You can credit her passion for her child, sympathize with her heartbreak — and still cringe at her wholly irrational cause.

No amount of discrediting makes a difference. One theory was that a preservative in children’s vaccines called thimerosal was causing autism. But the U.S. removed thimerosal from most childhood vaccines in 2001. If the theory had been sound, this should have reduced cases of autism. It didn’t. Cases have continued to rise, and the same held true in Canada and Denmark after eliminating thimerosal in the 1990s.

Another theory, latched onto by McCarthy, is that the MMR vaccine in particular causes autism. Former surgeon Andrew Wakefield publicized this supposed link in a famous article in the British medical journal The Lancet. It has since been thoroughly debunked. The Lancet retracted Wakefield’s paper, and the British Medical Journal reported that he “falsified data.” He had his medical license revoked. All of which should have been enough to give the anti-vaxxers pause. Nonetheless, they fight on.

Most parents don’t listen. Only 1.8 percent of kindergartners get exempted from vaccinations, according to NBC News. But the number is higher in some states. In Oregon, the rate is 6.4 percent, with some counties hitting double digits. In California, Marin County has an exemption rate of nearly 8 percent. The more kids go unvaccinated, the greater the chance that diseases can get a foothold.

They usually are imported from abroad, but the absence of vaccination is a boon to their spread. A study in the journal Pediatrics found that the 2010 whooping-cough outbreak in California — when the state had the highest number of cases since 1947 — hit hardest in areas with high levels of nonvaccination. In 2013, measles cases tripled nationwide. Outbreaks were centered in religious communities in Brooklyn, N.Y., Texas and North Carolina that had resisted vaccination. New York City has another small outbreak right now.

These are dangerous illnesses, and the victims of an outbreak are often infants too small to have yet received vaccinations. McCarthy styles herself a “mother warrior.” If so, the kids sickened in the fallout from reduced vaccinations are the victims of friendly fire. Nothing good can come from undoing one of the miracles of medical progress.

Syndicated columnist Rich Lowry can be reached at comments.lowry@nationalreview.com.

Comments

Part of the Tribune family of products

© 2014 TAMPA MEDIA GROUP, LLC